Category: campaigns

New updates in our website!

COFACE Families Europe coordinated the European Awareness Raising Campaign on Cyberbullying #DeleteCyberbullying from February 2013 to July 2014. The project was financed under the Daphne III programme of the European Commission.

The project aimed at raising awareness around Europe on the phenomenon of cyberbullying. The work achieved by the project is the successful cooperation of eight organisations from seven different countries, Belgium, Hungary, Spain, the UK, Bulgaria, Greece and Finland. The partners brought different perspectives and experience to the project, but all agreed, that effective prevention and early detection of cyberbullying is key, and can be best achieved by informing parents, teachers and teens about the different forms it can take, and how to react.

The project was a very ambitious undertaking, and among others delivered a successful European conference on cyberbullying in Madrid in May 2013 which brought together key stakeholders across the EU working on the topic. The second activity achieved with success was the Big March, a virtual march enabling civil society as a whole to demonstrate and bring the issue of cyberbullying to the attention of policy makers.

The partners of the project developed two tools for parents, teenagers and teachers. The first one was a very successful awareness raising video: “Cyberbullying: there is a way out” available in 11 languages and the second one, the #Deletecyberbullying app for android mobile phones taking users through a quiz which will either redirect them to appropriate resources or test their knowledge about cyberbullying.

You can read our updates on “Digital Future”, “Online safety”, “Data protection and Privacy” and of course, Cyberbullying in our website: http://www.coface-eu.org/category/digitalisation

Find out more about the work of COFACE Families Europe at www.coface-eu.org and subscribe to our monthly newsletter http://tinyurl.com/cofacenws or visit us on Facebook /COFACE.EU and Twitter @COFACE_EU and @dcyberbullying

Advertisements

ENABLE Hackathon and ambassador training

NewsOct-Hackatonenable On the 12th, 13th and 14th of October, the ENABLE project (European Network Against Bullying in Learning and Leisure Environments) held a Hackathon price ceremony and an ambassador training in London.

Launched in June 2015, the ENABLE Hackathon called on young people to propose initiatives and ideas on how to facilitate conversations about cyberbullying and bullying between young people, help them understand the phenomenon and find creative solutions to deal with this problem.

The Hackathon ceremony brought together 6 winning teams from all over the world to present their initiatives and ideas such as mobile applications, peer support programmes, awareness raising campaigns and many more.

The ENABLE Ambassador Training took place on the 13th and 14th of October, following the ENABLE Hackathon, and was attended by teachers from Greece, the United Kingdom, Croatia and Denmark. During the two day training, teachers were guided through the ENABLE project’s key deliverables and how they can be used directly in schools to help students develop key social and emotional skills such as empathy, increased self-awareness, communication skills, active listening and a sense of responsibility.

The Social and Emotional Learning lesson plans include 10 lessons aimed at combatting bullying in a school environment by increasing the emotional intelligence in young people aged 11-14. They cover fundamental questions such as the construction of an individual’s identity, understanding bullying, enhancing peer support and peer mentoring.

Martin Schmalzried from COFACE attended the training as a member of the ENABLE Think Tank, building on the lessons learned from the #DeleteCyberbullying project to provide advice on the resources developed within the ENABLE project.

For more information about the ENABLE project, visit the ENABLE website here

Live Without Bullying – An initiative by KMOP, Greece

The rapid rise of bullying has been recognized as one of the most concerning phenomena of the last decade. In response to this, KMOP (Family and Childcare Centre) in Greece has developed and launched its new programme “Live Without Bullying”.

Live without bullying kmop

“Live Without Bullying” is a pioneering innovative programme for Greece. At its heart lies an electronic platform, where children and adolescents facing bullying problems may seek help and support from peers who get a special training so as to become online mentors. These peer mentors are constantly under the supervision of professional psychologists and chat administrators. Moreover, educators and parents have a separate forum in the platform for exchanging views and getting advice from psychologists. Rich informational and educational material on the issue of school- and cyber-bullying is always available for users in the form of multimedia content through an electronic library.

All the mentoring sessions for users which take place online are free and anonymous, encouraging thus children and adults to express their worries and seek support from the comfort of their own home.

The programme is being implemented in cooperation with the Adolescent Health Unit of the 2nd Paediatric Clinic of University of Athens, “P. & A. Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital, and the University of Peloponnese. The programme is already being rolled-out in a municipality of Attica with success and it is hoped that in following academic year it is going to expand to a large number of towns across Greece.

For more information about KMOP, please visit the website
For more information about the programme “Live Without Bullying” please visit the website (in Greek)

The Big March, our virtual protest against bullying and cyberbullying

The Big March 2014 / Over 100,000 Europeans are supporting our virtual protest against bullying and cyberbullying

BigMarch printscreen
To see the Big March live go to our website now (until 5.00 pm CET): www.coface-eu.org

More than half (55%) of children in Europe who have been bullied said they became depressed as a result, with over a third saying they harmed themselves (35%) or thought about suicide (38%), according to a new poll* conducted by BeatBullying and the #DeleteCyberbullying campaign.

The poll of more than 2,000 adults and children from across Europe found that worryingly, 34% of adults thought that bullying is regarded as a ‘normal part of growing up’, and one in six adults (16%) said it is regarded as ‘character building’ by most people in their country, raising concerns amongst campaigners that the pain caused by bullying still remains hidden to many European citizens.

To raise awareness of this issue and show their support for the millions of children affected, today, young people, parents, schools, and other organisations are joining The Big March 2014 to deliver a virtual petition to the European Commission, calling for new laws and much-needed funding to protect children from bullying and cyberbullying.

The hidden impact of cyberbullying

You can’t always see the pain caused by bullying, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t hurt.

Please take a moment to watch and share our brand new Big March campaign video. Please share the video with your friends and family on Facebook, Twitter and any other social networks and help us spread the word!


Almost 95,000 people from across Europe are supporting BeatBullying and #DeleteCyberbullying’s Big March campaign which will take place on 11 June. We are marching online for every child that has hidden their tears, bruises, and scars.

Find out more about what we’re fighting for and sign up today at bigmarch.beatbullying.org

Thank you.

BeatBullying and #DeleteCyberbullying

Final conference and App launch

The event will be held on 4th June, 15:00-18:00 CET, followed by a light drinks reception at the Northern Ireland Executive Brussels Office. [Live streaming available].

The programme and more information here

One and a half years after the launch of the #DeleteCyberBullying Project, it is time to take stock of the milestones and achievements of the campaign and look at the challenges that still lie ahead.

The work achieved by the project is the successful cooperation of eight organisations from seven different countries, Belgium, Hungary, Spain, the UK, Bulgaria, Greece and Finland. The partners brought different perspectives and experience to the project, but all agreed, that effective prevention and early detection of cyberbullying is key, and can be best achieved by informing parents, teachers and teens about the different forms it can take, and how to react.

DC INFOG

The project was a very ambitious undertaking, and among others delivered a successful European conference in Madrid in May 2013, a very popular short educational animation (with over 50.000 views on YouTube), as well as the app for phones and tablets, for the time being in Android version, with the iOS version expected by September. The project also calls upon the expression of solidarity and civic courage through the virtual, online Big March to be held on the 11 June 2014.

Through the tools developed by the partnership, key messages are to speak up, and tell a trusted adult about cyberbullying.

Have your voice heard: join us in The Big March!

#DeleteCyberbullying tent

It is now almost a daily occurrence that we hear about a tragedy or a particularly cruel case of cyberbullying in the media across the European Union. As children and young people spend more and more time online in our hyper connected world, the shadow side of the internet is also known to more and more of us.

Cyberbullying is not only researched, but many organisations are doing excellent work in educating young people and parents, and offering a safe place to seek help and guidance. We believe however, that more needs to be done to tackle the global phenomena of cyberbullying. Governments and the European Institutions also bare responsibility in ensuring that the proper legislative framework is there to prevent cyberbullying, and that sufficient resources are allocated to organisations to support victims of cyberbullying through early detection and early intervention.

What better day to call on citizens to join our effort in asking the EU and Members States for more effective legislation, than the UN’s World Day of Social Justice, as Member States themselves have signed up and pledged their commitments to fighting inequalities, and helping the most vulnerable. Perhaps the fight against bullying could also deserve its own European Day.

As an integral part of the #Deletecyberbullying project led by COFACE, we are inviting you today to visit the Big March Park, read more about the issue, pledge your support, and ultimately join us in our virtual, on-line demonstration on the 11th June.

It is very easy to take part in our peaceful online demonstration: participants are invited to register on bigmarch.beatbullying.org and create a personalised avatar of themselves, and eventually join masses of other citizens across the EU in marching across some of the most well known websites on the 11th June.

Please also come and visit the #DeleteCyberbullying tent in the Big March Park, where you can see what our project is about, the short animated video in 9 languages, our infographics and the testimonies of young people.

We are calling for the right of children to be protected online! Create your avatar and join the #BigMarch here: bigmarch.beatbullying.org

To keep up-to date on the fight against cyberbullying, follow #deletecyberbullying on @dcyberbullying.

bigmarch

Let’s create a better internet together!

newsfeb-sid2014

Happy Safer Internet Day 2014! #SID2014

This year’s Safer Internet Day theme looks at the responsibility that we must all take in making the internet a better place. Whether we are children and young people, parents and carers, educators or social care workers, or indeed industry, decision makers or politicians, we all have a role to play.

We can contribute to foster the positive and eliminate the negative online in many ways, regardless of who we are. For example:

Children and young people can help to foster the positive by being kind and respectful to others online, by protecting their online reputations, and by seeking out positive opportunities to create, engage and share online. They can help to eliminate the negative by being ‘helpful bystanders’: supporting peers if they encounter issues online, taking a stand against cyberbullying, and reporting any inappropriate or illegal content they find.

In this regard, COFACE is currently coordinating the European Awareness Raising Campaign on Cyberbullying: #DeleteCyberbullying. The project, through the cooperation of the international partners, contributes to developing a common approach to risk-prevention, information and guidelines to families, parents, children and other relevant stakeholders. We have created a short educational video Cyberbullying: there is a way out! available now in 9 languages.

Parents and carers can help to foster the positive by maintaining an open and honest dialogue with their children about their online lives, by supporting them with their personal development online and helping them to deal with any concerns or issues, seeking out positive opportunities to share with their children online, and helping their children to find and use good quality digital resources. They can help to eliminate the negative by monitoring and supporting their child’s online activity, by modelling positive online behaviours themselves, and by also reporting any inappropriate or illegal content they find.

Educators and social care workers can help to foster the positive by equipping children and young people with the digital literacy skills they require for today’s world, and giving them opportunities to use and create positive content online. They can help to eliminate the negative by supporting youngsters if they encounter problems online, and by giving them the confidence and skills to seek help from others.

Industry can help to foster the positive by creating and promoting positive content and services online, developing ethical and transparent policies, and protecting our data. They can help to eliminate the negative by making systems and services more secure by design, by being more responsive to user concerns, and by providing quick and easy access to support if things do go wrong.

Decision makers and politicians can help to foster the positive by ensuring that there are opportunities in the curriculum for children to learn and teachers to teach about online safety, ensuring that parents and carers have access to appropriate information and sources of support, and that industry are encouraged to self regulate their content and services. They must also take the lead in governance and legislation, and ultimately ensure the safety and wellbeing of children and young people through effective child protection strategies for the online world.

About SID
Safer Internet Day is organised by the joint Insafe/INHOPE network, with the support of the European Commission each 11 February to promote safer and more responsible use of online technology and mobile devices, especially among children and young people. On Safer Internet Day hundreds of events are organised to raise awareness of online safety issues.

Find out more about Safer Internet Day at www.saferinternetday.org   #SID2014

COFACE’s profile on the SID website: www.saferinternetday.org/web/coface