Category: European project

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COFACE Families Europe coordinated the European Awareness Raising Campaign on Cyberbullying #DeleteCyberbullying from February 2013 to July 2014. The project was financed under the Daphne III programme of the European Commission.

The project aimed at raising awareness around Europe on the phenomenon of cyberbullying. The work achieved by the project is the successful cooperation of eight organisations from seven different countries, Belgium, Hungary, Spain, the UK, Bulgaria, Greece and Finland. The partners brought different perspectives and experience to the project, but all agreed, that effective prevention and early detection of cyberbullying is key, and can be best achieved by informing parents, teachers and teens about the different forms it can take, and how to react.

The project was a very ambitious undertaking, and among others delivered a successful European conference on cyberbullying in Madrid in May 2013 which brought together key stakeholders across the EU working on the topic. The second activity achieved with success was the Big March, a virtual march enabling civil society as a whole to demonstrate and bring the issue of cyberbullying to the attention of policy makers.

The partners of the project developed two tools for parents, teenagers and teachers. The first one was a very successful awareness raising video: “Cyberbullying: there is a way out” available in 11 languages and the second one, the #Deletecyberbullying app for android mobile phones taking users through a quiz which will either redirect them to appropriate resources or test their knowledge about cyberbullying.

You can read our updates on “Digital Future”, “Online safety”, “Data protection and Privacy” and of course, Cyberbullying in our website: http://www.coface-eu.org/category/digitalisation

Find out more about the work of COFACE Families Europe at www.coface-eu.org and subscribe to our monthly newsletter http://tinyurl.com/cofacenws or visit us on Facebook /COFACE.EU and Twitter @COFACE_EU and @dcyberbullying

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ENABLE final event on bullying in the context of child’s play

enablelogoOn the 21st and 22nd of September, the ENABLE (European Network Against Bullying in Learning and Leisure Environments) partnership held the final event of the European Project. COFACE Families Europe has been involved since the beginning of the project as a member of the Think Tank, bringing some of the expertise gathered from the #DeleteCyberbullying project and promoting the ENABLE deliverables via its website.

ENABLE aims to tackle bullying in a holistic way, helping young people exercise their fundamental rights in the home, school, class and community (i.e. peer group). The project aims to develop social and emotional learning (SEL) skills as a means of building resilience in young people so that they can better understand and become more responsible and effective for their on- and offline social interactions. ENABLE has been implemented in half a dozen countries across Europe, providing teachers with detailed lesson plans on SEL in a number of languages including Croatian. COFACE’s Croatian member, Korak po Korak, which is also highly active in prevention of cyberbullying, was present at the event.

The two day final event offered a mix of plenary sessions and workshops, including a brainstorming session during which participants were invited to develop a “roadmap” on key themes such as privacy and security, e-presence and communications, empathy and ethics, hate speech and extremism. Some noteworthy presentations from the conference included:

– The intervention of American expert Anne Collier who stressed the importance of a whole school approach to tackle cyberbullying and the failure of “zero tolerance” policies assorted to punitive measures such as suspension from school.

– Innovative examples of interactive games carried out by Urko Fernández from Pantallas Amigas (Spain), which consisted in a sorting exercise of social networking comments/messages drafted by psychologists. Children were encouraged to discuss whether the messages were safe or insulting and the video game setting sparked the debate and exchange in a natural way.

– A demonstration of security risks linked to the Whatsapp application which was presented by Mohamed Mustafa Saidalavi, allowing a person to send/receive messages from another person’s Whatsapp account by borrowing that person’s phone for a short moment and linking his/her account via a QR code on their own device.

COFACE, represented by Martin Schmalzried, spoke in a workshop on bullying in the context of child’s play – toys, games, social media and gaming environments.

Playing is important. Children develop a great number of social and technical skills via play. Recently, national education systems have taken an interest in new methods of learning, including the “gamification” of learning or the integration of new technologies in their teaching methods. While there are benefits to these innovative methods, one must be careful since the field of education is a lucrative market. For example, the UK based company Pearson, specialized in education, has a turnover of over £4 billion. The more “gamification” and new technologies are integrated into schools, the more money some of these companies can make. To guard against such vested interests, integrating innovative teaching methods in school should require careful consideration and be based on clear and proven added values. Besides, many of the video games cited as an example for their educational potential have been developed outside the video game industry (Minecraft, Portal…).

As regards bullying in video games, it takes many different forms such as flaming, trolling, griefing, identify theft, all of which may or may not fit the definition of bullying. Some examples include: Hacking into someone’s account and destroying their creations or stealing their virtual objects, and, in-game sabotage, such as ruining a player’s quest or “unreasonable and repeated killing” of a player, which is often referred to as “griefing”.

Bullying in video games is especially targeted towards specific groups, especially women, but also towards the LGBT and people with disabilities.  New technologies such as Virtual and Augmented Reality have the potential to exacerbate some of these issues:

– Identify theft with technologies enabling realistic modelling of a person.
– Physical pain, as companies develop tools to increase the realism of VR.
– Increased trauma in case of in game extreme violence or harassment.
– Desensitisation which may contribute to lowering empathy.

Yet researchers have also found a number of benefits to VR which may, in certain simulated settings, increase empathy or help get past trauma. Monitoring developments in this field is therefore key in order to reap the benefits and minimize the risks.

For more information about the ENABLE project, visit the official website

Preventing bullying and cyberbullying through social and emotional learning

enablelogoOn the 11th and 12th of March, European Schoolnet organized the launch of the ENABLE project in Athens and brought together more than 50 policy makers, teachers, academics and health professionals from around the globe, the aim being to introduce the project, provide a forum of discussion for the Think Tank members and create solidarity as the project continues.

ENABLE (European Network Against Bullying in Learning and Leisure Environments) is an EU-funded that aims to tackle bullying in a holistic way, helping young people exercise their fundamental rights in the home, school, class and community.

The two-year project is built around three axes:

1. Fostering socio-emotional development of young people, by increasing their empathy and self-esteem through social and emotional learning modules that can be integrated into the curriculum. Teachers and parents will be trained through online courses and in national and European communities of practice.

2. Enhancing young people’s self-awareness, and their ability to objectively reflect on their behaviour and how their actions impact on others using self-monitoring techniques, such as daily logs and peer reviewing of their own photo/video productions.

3. Providing better routes to help for young people through a training module for professionals working with children/young people, policy-making support for schools in dealing with issues that often occur or are initiated outside the school context, and innovative digital tools to reduce the impact of bullying incidents. Training and peer support for parents will ensure a 360 degree approach.

COFACE, as a Think Tank member of the ENABLE project, was present at the public launch and will bring in its experience from the #DeleteCyberbullying project to contribute to the project’s success.

For more information about the project and how you can get involved, visit the ENABLE website

Project Update

Internet trolls. Impersonations and stolen identities. Hateful and abusive comments. Intimidation, manipulation, written violence and bullying… The new social media opens fantastic possibilities to socialise, but the lawlessness of the Internet, its potential for casual, breath-taking cruelty, and its capacity to cloak a bully’s identity all present slippery new challenges to this transitional generation of analogue parents, teachers and youth workers.

Online bullying can be more psychologically savage and damaging than schoolyard bullying. The Internet erases inhibitions; anonymity gives way to uninhibited attacks, hatred, and violence. Many young cyber bullies don’t believe they have had an impact on their victims.

During the 1,5 years duration of the project we aimed at mapping existing cases, events, understanding the different aspects of the phenomena. We encouraged the involvement of children, parents, teachers through:

Despite the project’s official end, COFACE is planning to release an upgraded version of the app for Android and an iOS version in end October. In addition, a teacher’s manual will be made available to help teachers develop lesson plans on cyberbullying. Watch this space and don’t hesitate to contact us!